November 2009


Here are role assignments for The Aeneid, Books 10-12. In making these assignments, I tried to improve the dynamics of the reading by having different speakers say things when the context is a conversation or a confrontation. I also tried my best to maintain uniformity of roles for the entire reading. Thus if you are Aeneas at the beginning of a book, I have tried to assign you the role of Aeneas throughout as far as possible, in addition of course to the Virgil-X part you might have to read.

I am learning how to do this better as I go along and might revisit my earlier role assignments to improve them. Please let me know of any corrections and suggestions.

Thanks as always for your support of the group and Happy Thanksgiving! Maybe these role assignments will give you something additional to chew on during the break 🙂

Book 10: The Death of Princes
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1 Virgil-A (1-295) *
2 Virgil-B (296-605) **
3 Virgil-C (606-965) ***
4 Virgil-D (966-1276) ****
5* Turnus (386-393, 685-691, 937-952), Pallas (508-522, 579-583, 640-645)
6** Jupiter (9-21, 650-657, 851-855, 872-880), Aeneas (745-750, 783-788, 1154-1161)
7*** Venus (24-82), Aeneas (348-355, 407-412), Mezentius (1085-1089, 1184-1198, 1206-1214, 1229-1235, 1262-1272)
8**** Juno (84-157, 857-869, 882-889), Cymodocea (315-338), Magus (735-742)

Book 11: Debaters and a Warrior Girl
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1 Virgil-A (1-286) *
2 Virgil-B (287-721) **
3 Virgil-C (722-1032) ***
4 Virgil-D (1033-1240) ****
5* Latinus (410-453), Prayer (657-661), Diana (726-812), Aunus’ son (957-961), Opis (1145-1156)
6** Evander (209-250), Camilla (932-936, 1119-1124), Arruns (1071-1082)
7*** Drances (170-180, 463-510), Venulus (329-400), Camilla (683-689)
8**** Aeneas (17-38, 56-79, 148-164) Turnus (514-601, 627-635, 692-706), Tarchon (994-1006)

Book 12: The Fortunes of War
=============================
1 Virgil-A (1-296) *
2 Virgil-B (297-653) **
3 Virgil-C (654-962) ***
4 Virgil-D (963-1299) ****
5* Tolumnius (356-364), Aeneas (430-436,595-602, 767-781, 1206-1212), Iapyx (582-587), Saces (884-900)
6** Amata (81-91), Aeneas (237-264), Metiscus (847-854), Jupiter (1072-1093, 1126-1140), Turnus (1266-1276)
7*** Latinus (27-63), Latinus (268-290), Juno (191-206, 210-214, 1096-1123), Juturna (314-327, 1180-1199)
8**** Turnus (14-25, 68-76, 102-115, 135-141, 493-497, 856-879, 915-923, 940-944)

Prashant Andrade (fea_123@yahoo.com)

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This is a reminder that we will be reading Books 7 through 9 of The Fitzgerald translation of the Aeneid at the Plymouth District Library on Saturday, November 7, starting at 12:45 pm. We will have a couple of extra copies of the translation in case you do not have a copy. We will be in the Storytime room (lower level) this time as there were a lot of meetings scheduled in all the other rooms, November seems to be the busiest month for meetings at the library.

The Aeneid has read really beautifully so far and it surprised a few of us who were more familiar with the Homeric epics and their examination of human nature and behavior. Even though Virgil is ostensibly writing his great nationalist epic with one eye always kept towards legitimizing the rule of Julius Caesar and his son Augustus, the poet in him cannot help
sketching out wonderful and passionate men and women.

I was thrilled when after the reading of The Aeneid last month, several veterans of other book clubs at the reading commented on how there was nothing quite like this read aloud group they had ever participated in. Here is how one reader put why he loves reading epic poetry out aloud and participating in the group:

===============
The classic epics were meant to be declaimed and heard.
Scops, bards, troubadours memorized huge swaths of
The Iliad, The Odyssey, The Aeneid, Beowulf, Canterbury Tales,
Gawain and the Green Knight, The Seafarer, Pearl, Paradise Lost
and even Pound’s Cantos so they could recite them to an eager
audience.  The customs and manners of a classic age, the use
of imagery, the connection to present day humanity, the cultural
impact of these long poems, and the grand mission of the writers
are events that should not decay.  We are keeping alive their mission
by reading their works aloud and discussing them. I love being part
of the public readings of our classical heritage in an age that smacks of easy commercialism.
Bravo Virgil!  Bravo Milton!  Bravo Homer!

Mike Nader
==============

Finally, here is a role assignment sheet for Books 7-9. If you are reading roles Virgil-A to D skip any speech of 5 lines or more as it will be assigned to someone.

Book 7: Juno Served by a Fury
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1 Virgil-A (1-254) ****
2 Virgil-B (255-560) *
3 Virgil-C (561-826) **
4 Virgil-D (827-1122) ***
5* Father Faunus (125-132), Aeneas (158-178)
6** Latinus (259-280, 350-370), Juno (398-441, 452-466, 757-768)
7*** Amata (496-514, 552-557), Allecto (581-601, 623-628, 747-755)
8**** Turnus (604-613), Ilioneus (283-332), Latinus (816-823)

Book 8: Arcadian Allies
=================================
1 Virgil-A (1-247) *** 
2 Virgil-B (366-490) ****
3 Virgil-C (491-792) *
4 Virgil-D (793-992) **
5* Tibernius (48-87), Aeneas (96-107, 159-164, 173-203)
6** Evander (208-234, 248-365, 415-445, 464-473, 480-485, 631-704, 761-789)
7*** Hymn to Hercules (388-400), Aeneas (723-734)
8**** Vulcan (528-541, 589-595), Venus (497-515, 828-832)

Book 9: A Night Sortie, A Day Assault
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1 Virgil-A (1-270) ****
2 Virgil-B (283-570) *
3 Virgil-C (581-833) ***
4 Virgil-D (864-1132) **
5* Iris (8-19), Turnus (25-31, 177-218, 1030-1040), Caicus (49-54), Jupiter’s mother (116-129, 162-166)
6** Nisus (252-268, 284-302, 325-340, 452-458, 571-580, 605-610)
7*** Jupiter (132-146), Euryalus (271-282, 395-411), Aletes (343-347, 351-359)
8**** Ascanius (361-393, 869-875), Euryalus’s mother (680-704), Numanus (834-863), Apollo (892-898, 911-917), Pandarus (1024-1028), Mnestheus (1082-1091)

Prashant Andrade (fea_123@yahoo.com)